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OKLAHOMA SUPERCOMPUTING SYMPOSIUM 2018



OSCER

OU IT, it.ou.edu

OK EPSCoR, okepscor.org

Great Plains Network, www.greatplains.net


Table of Contents


PLENARY SPEAKERS

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Michael Norman
Michael Norman

Director
San Diego Supercomputer Center
University of California San Diego

Topic: "Tales from the Long Tail of HPC: The Comet Experiment"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract

Coming soon

Biography

Dr. Michael L. Norman was named Interim Director of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in June 2009 and was appointed to the position of Director in September 2010. Dr. Norman is a distinguished professor of Physics at UCSD and a globally recognized astrophysicist. Dr. Norman is a pioneer in using advanced computational methods to explore the universe and its beginnings. In this capacity, he has directed the Laboratory for Computational Astrophysics — a collaborative effort between UCSD and SDSC, resulting in the Enzo community code for astrophysics and cosmology, in use worldwide.

Following his appointment as SDSC's chief scientific officer in June 2008, Dr. Norman worked to foster collaborations across the UCSD campus for cyberinfrastructure-oriented research, development and education. He also serves as division director of SDSC's Cyberinfrastructure Research, Education and Development (CI-RED), and is the Principal Investigator for two of SDSC's leading HPC systems — Gordon-Simons and Comet — which together represent more than $42 million in National Science Foundation funding.

Dr. Norman's work has earned him numerous honors, including Germany's prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize, the IEEE Sidney Fernbach Award, and several HPCC Challenge Awards. He also is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Physical Society. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering and applied sciences from University of California Davis, and in 1984 completed his post-doctoral work at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany.

From 1986 to 2000, Dr. Norman held numerous positions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as a National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) associate director and senior research scientist under Larry Smarr, currently UCSD's director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2); and as a professor of astronomy. From 1984 to 1986, he was a staff member at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Dr. Robert M. Panoff
Dr. Robert M. Panoff

Executive Director
Shodor Education Foundation
Scientist in Residence
Wofford College

Topic: "What the Sciences Can Learn from Each Other: An Exploration of Interdisciplinary Supercomputing"

Slides: Click here.

Talk Abstract

Research and progress in high performance computing often require multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary efforts to take advantage of model and simulation approaches. In this talk, I will explore some ideas that demonstrate how the thinking in one science can influence a simulation in another. We'll draw examples from biology and physics, primarily, to show what we can learn from each other.

Biography

Dr. Robert M. Panoff is founder and Executive Director of the Shodor Education Foundation, a non-profit education and research corporation in Durham NC, dedicated to reform and improvement of mathematics and science education through computational and communication technologies. He serves as Undergraduate Education Director for both the eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) and the Blue Waters Petascale Computing effort, both in partnership with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). He is currently Visiting Professor at Wofford College. His work explores the interactions between technology and education to develop courses and interactive simulation modules that combine standards, curriculum, supercomputing resources and desktop computers.

In recognition of Dr. Panoff's efforts in college faculty enhancement and curriculum development, Shodor was named as an NSF Foundation Partner for the revitalization of undergraduate education. In 1998, Shodor established the Shodor Computational Science Institute, which was expanded with NSF funding in 2001 to become the National Computational Science Institute (NCSI). Shodor's Computational Science Education Reference Desk (CSERD) serves nearly 4 million webviews per month as a Pathway portal of the National Science Digital Library. Dr. Panoff consults at several national laboratories and is a frequent presenter at NSF workshops on visualization, supercomputing, and networking.

Dr. Panoff received his M.A. and Ph.D. in theoretical Physics from Washington University in St. Louis, with both pre- and postdoctoral work at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. In 2005, Wofford College, awarded Dr. Panoff, an honorary Doctor of Science degree, in recognition of his leadership in computational science education. In 2014, he was the recipient of the SIGCSE Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education Award.

Dan Stanzione
Dan Stanzione

Executive Director
Texas Advanced Computing Center
The University of Texas at Austin

Topic: "The Next Generation NSF Computing Resource"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract

Coming soon

Biography

Dan Stanzione is the Executive Director of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin and the Principal Investigator for Wrangler. He is also the PI for TACC's 10 PetaFlop Stampede supercomputer, and has previously been involved in the deployment and operation of the Ranger and Lonestar supercomputers at TACC. He served as the Co-Director of The iPlant Collaborative, an ambitious endeavor to build cyberinfrastructure to address the grand challenges of plant science. Prior to joining TACC, Dr. Stanzione was the founding director of the Ira A. Fulton High Performance Computing Institute (HPCI) at Arizona State University (ASU). Before ASU, he served as an AAAS Science Policy Fellow in the National Science Foundation and as a research professor at Clemson University, his alma mater.

Henry Neeman
Henry Neeman

Assistant Vice President – Research Strategy Advisor
Information Technology
Director
OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER)
Information Technology
Associate Professor
College of Engineering
Adjunct Associate Professor
School of Computer Science
University of Oklahoma
Joint Co-manager (with Dana Brunson)
XSEDE Campus Engagement program

Topic: "OSCER State of the Center Address"

Slides:   PowerPoint   PDF

Talk Abstract

The OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER) celebrated its 17th anniversary on August 31 2018. In this report, we examine what OSCER is, what OSCER does, what OSCER has accomplished in its 16 years, and where OSCER is going.

Biography

Dr. Henry Neeman is the Director of the OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research, Assistant Vice President Information Techology – Research Strategy Advisor, Associate Professor in the College of Engineering and Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science at the University of Oklahoma. He and Dana Brunson have been appointed joint co-leads of the XSEDE Campus Engagement program, which includes the Campus Champions.

He received his BS in computer science and his BA in statistics with a minor in mathematics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1987, his MS in CS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1990 and his PhD in CS from UIUC in 1996. Prior to coming to OU, Dr. Neeman was a postdoctoral research associate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at UIUC, and before that served as a graduate research assistant both at NCSA and at the Center for Supercomputing Research & Development.

In addition to his own teaching and research, Dr. Neeman has collaborated with dozens of research groups, applying High Performance Computing techniques in fields such as numerical weather prediction, bioinformatics and genomics, data mining, high energy physics, astronomy, nanotechnology, petroleum reservoir management, river basin modeling and engineering optimization. He serves as an ad hoc advisor to student researchers in many of these fields.

Dr. Neeman's research interests include high performance computing, scientific computing, parallel and distributed computing and computer science education.

Daniel Andresen
Daniel Andresen

Professor
Department of Computer Science
Kansas State University
Director
Institute for Computational Research

Topic: "Birds-of-a-Feather Session: XSEDE Region 4 Campus Champions" (with BJ Lougee)

BoF Slides: available after the Symposium

Abstract

The XSEDE Campus Champions program supports campus representatives as a local source of knowledge about local, regional and national High Performance Computing and Cyberinfrastructure information, including XSEDE resources.

We would like to invite everyone — any current Campus Champions, possible Campus Champions, and those who are just curious — to a "Meeting of the Champions." During our Birds-of-a-Feather session, join your fellow Region 4 Campus Champions (from AR, KS, LA, MO, NE, OK and TX) to discuss the program, what you can expect to gain from participating, what we hope to achieve in the way of both short term and long term goals, future visions for the program, etc. Dr. Dan Andresen (Kansas State University) and BJ Lougee (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City) will act as the emcees for this meeting, which is expected to draw attendance from both current and prospective Campus Champions from around the Region. Response to these regional meetings in other parts of the US have been very favorable, so we're anxious to offer the opportunity to all of you!

Biography

Daniel Andresen, Ph.D. is a professor of Computing & Information Sciences at Kansas State University and Director of the Institute for Computational Research. His research includes embedded and distributed computing, biomedical systems, and high performance scientific computing. Dr. Andresen coordinates the activities of the K-State research computing cluster, Beocat, and advises the local chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). He is a National Science Foundation CAREER award winner, and has been granted research funding from the NSF, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and industry. He is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, the IEEE Computer Society, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the American Society for Engineering Education, and has been an XSEDE Campus Champion since 2011.

Shady Boukhary

Undergraduate Student
Computer Science Department
Midwestern State University

Topic: "Scientific Kernel Performance Evaluation under CUDA and OpenACC: A Case Study"
(with Eduardo Colmenares)

Slides: available after the Symposium

Abstract

This research studies the behavior and performance of two and widely used computationally intensive kernels in two of the most popular many-core programming models, CUDA and OpenACC. This research also shows that the nature of the problem plays a crucial role in determining what many-core model will provide the highest performance. The first kernel under study is a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which samples a signal over a period of time and divides it into its frequency components, computing the Discrete Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) of a sequence. The second kernel is Matrix Multiplication, which is a critical routine in Mathematics, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Deep Learning.

Biography

Shady Boukhary is a Computer Science student at Midwestern State University. He is very passionate about technology and has always been fascinated by its impact on daily lives. His main interests are High Performance Computing, Deep Learning, and Software Engineering. Shady Boukhary has also shipped multiple software solutions to multiple software companies.

Keith Brewster
Keith Brewster

Director of Operations and Senior Research Scientist
Center for Analysis & Prediction of Storms
University of Oklahoma

Topic: "Can a Fleet of Drones Improve Your Weather Forecast? Experiments with 3D Mesonet"

Slides:   PDF

Talk Abstract

For the past 25 years, the State of Oklahoma has benefitted from having a network of 120 surface weather observing stations, known as the Oklahoma Mesonet, deployed across the state. It has been proposed that a fleet of automated Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS), also known as drones, could be deployed at many, or all, of the Mesonet sites, to make vertical profile measurements of temperature, humidity and pressure in the lower atmosphere, thus creating a 3D Mesonet. There are technical and policy impediments to deploying such a network today, but through the use of an Observing System Simulation Experiment, or OSSE, we can investigate the ability of such a network to improve the numerical weather forecasts for critical severe weather events. Here we present the results of a few tests that were performed by recently-graduated MS student Andrew Moore, utilizing OSCER's Schooner supercomputer.

Biography

Keith Brewster is Director of Operations and Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms at the University of Oklahoma and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the OU School of Meteorology. His research involves data assimilation of advanced observing systems for high resolution numerical weather analysis and prediction, including data from Doppler radars, satellites, wind profilers, aircraft and surface mesonet systems. He earned an M.S. and Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma and a B.S. from the University of Utah.

Eduardo Colmenares
Eduardo Colmenares

Assistant Professor
Computer Science Department
Midwestern State University

Topic: "Scientific Kernel Performance Evaluation under CUDA and OpenACC: A Case Study"
(with Shady Boukhary)

Slides: available after the Symposium

Abstract

This research studies the behavior and performance of two and widely used computationally intensive kernels in two of the most popular many-core programming models, CUDA and OpenACC. This research also shows that the nature of the problem plays a crucial role in determining what many-core model will provide the highest performance. The first kernel under study is a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which samples a signal over a period of time and divides it into its frequency components, computing the Discrete Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) of a sequence. The second kernel is Matrix Multiplication, which is a critical routine in Mathematics, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Deep Learning.

Biography

Dr. Eduardo Colmenares is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Midwestern State University. He received his BS in Electronics Engineering from the Industrial University of Santander, Colombia, his Master of Science and PhD in Computer Science from Texas Tech University, both with Focus in High Performance Computing and Scientific Computing. Dr. Colmenares serves as a member of the steering committee for the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges (CCSC), and is also the author of multiple peer reviewed publications in HPC and Software Engineering. His research interest include HPC, Deep Learning and undergraduate Software Engineering.

Brady Deetz
Brady Deetz

IT Manager
Information Technology
Laureate Institute for Brain Research

Topic: "Making an HPC Storage Procurement Decision Informed by HPC"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Abstract

Laureate Institute for Brain Research faces yet another storage challenge in 2018. This challenge is created by the existence of a sizable amount (160 TB) of scientific data made up of files ranging in size between 20 KB and 80 KB that need to be available for analysis. While this data can be stored in our 5 PB nearline storage environment made up of HDDs and Ceph, performance for analysis is not what our users would prefer. Furthermore, LIBR operates a VMware environment consisting of approximately 150 guests consuming 50 TB of storage. Both scenarios would benefit greatly from a flash storage offering. Unfortunately, 200+ TB of flash storage is not a cheap ask. As such, LIBR embarked on an effort to add flash storage to its existing Ceph storage environment.

Because Ceph generally is not a commercial product with standardized hardware and known performance characteristics, LIBR must determine how its cluster will perform with specific disks under specific workloads. This talk covers how LIBR is leveraging its HPC environment to analyze over 20 billion benchmark data-points created with a battery of tests against each candidate model of SSD being evaluated in this project.

Biography

Brady Deetz is the head of IT for the Laureate Institute for Brain Research, a clinical neuroscience research institute in Tulsa OK. At LIBR, he is responsible for research computing and data storage in support of multidisciplinary research programs in neuroimaging, behavioral health, and biochemical measures. Key cyberinfrastructure resources include petascale tape storage; a petascale disk (Ceph) resource, and local compute servers.

Kyle Hutson
Kyle Hutson

System Administrator
Department of Computer Science
Kansas State University

Topic: "Birds-of-a-Feather Session: HPC System Administrators"

Slides: none

Abstract

We recently observed that system administrators are often leary of advice (even from their direct supervisors) unless it has been given from somebody else who (a) has signficant relevant experience, (b) they know and trust, and (c) can point out the "gotchas." This Birds-of-a-Feather session is for system administrators to talk among themselves about current pain-points, things we've done that have turned out well, and things we've done that have flopped.

Biography

Kyle Hutson has been involved with Linux system administration since 1994. He received his bachelor's degree from Kansas State University in computer engineering in 1995. He has worked in non-profit, public sector, and private sector IT services, including several years as a small business IT consultant. Kyle joined Kansas State University's HPC team in 2012.

Adnan Khaleel
Adnan Khaleel

Director, Global Sales Strategy for High Performance Computing & Artificial Intelligence
ISG
Dell EMC

Topic: "Can HPC technologies lead the way for AI?"

Slides: PDF

Talk Abstract:

Deep Learning (DL) is the new posterchild for cutting-edge technologies, with AI-fueled breakthroughs being announced almost on a daily basis. Many of the algorithms behind DL are several decades old, and advances in affordable hardware technologies, coupled with copious amounts of usable data, has led to the recent resurgence in interest. Even though we're still in the early days of DL as a technology, researchers are already running into hurdles of scalability. For the practitioners in HPC, this is nothing new, where the argument of scale-up vs scale-out has played out has seen a clear winner dictated more by practicality rather than technology. Is Deep Learning at a similar juncture, and what can our experience with HPC tell us about where it's headed?

Biography

Adnan Khaleel is a seasoned business development professional with over 18 years of experience in High Performance Computing and Machine Learning. Currently, Adnan is leading Global HPC Sales Strategy at Dell EMC, focusing on Sales Strategy for HPC & AI. Due of his technical background, Adnan often works very closely with customers in helping them choose optimal HPC solutions and architectures. Prior to Dell EMC, Adnan was the product manager at Cray responsible for big data analytics, and led the development and launch of the award winning Urika-XA™ High Performance Data Analytics (HPDA) platform. Prior to Cray, Adnan served as the chief technical marketer at Newisys, an Austin TX server startup, and prior to that, as a member of the Hardware Architecture groups at both HaL computers and Motorola, where he developed innovative simulation tools for architectural studies on next-generation massively parallel systems. Adnan has a deeply technical engineering background in designing SuperScalar processors, high-speed computer networks, and massively scalable systems design. He has also published several papers on computer networks, and holds a U.S. patent on multiprocessor technologies. He has an MBA from the McCombs School of Business at University of Texas and an MS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University.

Mark Laufersweiler
Mark Laufersweiler

Research Data Specialist
University Libraries
University of Oklahoma

Topic: "What's New with the Carpentries at OU: A Status Update"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Abstract

For nearly five years, with the last three as a foundation member, the University of Oklahoma has been associated with Software Carpentry, and recently the Carpentries Foundation. In January 2018, Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry merged to form a new Carpentries Foundation. This breakout session will start with a report on the merger, and the current state of the OU Carpentries over the past three years of membership. An update will be given on the current status of the renewal process with the Carpentries Foundation.

There are two new domains starting the process to join Software and Data Carpentries as part of the Carpentries Foundation. Library Carpentry and HPC Carpentry groups have been meeting, developing lessons and curriculum, following the Carpentries pedagogy and lesson development guidelines. Library Carpentry is further along in the process, as governance elements are being formed to help guide the community.

A brief outline of future activities of the OU Carpentries and how one can get involved, and the announcement of new domain lessons (geospatial for Data Carpentry) as well as updates to existing lessons will finish the session.

Biography

Dr. Mark Laufersweiler has always had a strong interest in computers, computing, data and data visualization. Upon completing his post-doc work for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, he was the lead computer systems administrator for 3.5 years serving the Florida State University Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science. He was then the Computer Systems Coordinator for the University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology from 1999-2013. Part of his duties included managing the real time data feed and maintaining the departmental data archive. He assisted with faculty in their courses to help foster computing skills needed for the classroom and instruction based on current best practices regarding research data and code development. Since the Fall of 2013, he has served as the Research Data Specialist for the University of Oklahoma Libraries. He is currently assisting the educational mission of the Libraries by developing and offering workshops, seminars and short courses, helping to inform the university community on best practices for data management and data management planning. He is also working on the formation of a data repository to host research data generated by the university community. He is a strong advocate of open source software and open access to data.

In 2008, Dr. Laufersweiler was awarded the Russell L. DeSouza Award. This award, sponsored by Unidata is for individuals whose energy, expertise, and active involvement enable the Unidata program to better serve geoscience. Honorees personify Unidata's ideal of a community that shares data, software, and ideas through computing and networking technologies.

BJ Lougee
BJ Lougee

Cyberinfrastructure Engineer and Cyberinfrastructure Practitioner
Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics (CADRE)
Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Topic: "Birds-of-a-Feather Session: XSEDE Region 4 Campus Champions" (with Dan Andresen)

BoF Slides: available after the Symposium

Abstract

The XSEDE Campus Champions program supports campus representatives as a local source of knowledge about local, regional and national High Performance Computing and Cyberinfrastructure information, including XSEDE resources.

We would like to invite everyone — any current Campus Champions, possible Campus Champions, and those who are just curious — to a "Meeting of the Champions." During our Birds-of-a-Feather session, join your fellow Region 4 Campus Champions (from AR, KS, LA, MO, NE, OK and TX) to discuss the program, what you can expect to gain from participating, what we hope to achieve in the way of both short term and long term goals, future visions for the program, etc. Dr. Dan Andresen (Kansas State University) and BJ Lougee (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City) will act as the emcees for this meeting, which is expected to draw attendance from both current and prospective Campus Champions from around the Region. Response to these regional meetings in other parts of the US have been very favorable, so we're anxious to offer the opportunity to all of you!

Biography

BJ Lougee is a computer scientist and cyberinfrastructure engineer and practitioner in the Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics (CADRE) at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. He is also the XSEDE Campus Champion Deputy Director for Region 4. Prior to joining the Bank in 2014, he was the Lead HPC Systems Administrator at the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) for the 76th Software Maintenance Group at Tinker Air Force Base. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from the University of Central Oklahoma. He is currently working toward his Master of Science in Computer Science, with an emphasis in HPC and machine learning, at Georgia Institute of Technology. He conducts research and development on the Bank's HPC environment, and trains researchers on using HPC. He has a particular research interest in helping to drive the adoption of HPC techniques in the economics field.

George Louthan
George Louthan

Associate Director for Research Computing Strategy
OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER)
University of Oklahoma

Topic: "Industrial HPC for Fun and Profit"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract

Telling stories about technical computing's application to common products and services is an effective way to provide relatable touchstones when communicating about HPC. This talk presents eight easily understood, and hopefully entertaining, stories about how high performance computing contributes to people's daily lives, with examples ranging from cars and trucks to laundry detergent and coffee cans, to low flow toilets. The purpose is to equip attendees with examples of useful stories and examples that they can employ in their own outreach and education efforts.

Biography

George Louthan is the Associate Director for Research Computing Strategy of the OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER) at the University of Oklahoma. Before coming to OU, he served as the Director of the Tandy Supercomputing Center, an initiative of the Oklahoma Innovation Institute in Tulsa OK. He holds a MS in Computer Science and undergraduate degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics from the University of Tulsa. Before moving to high performance computing, his background included work in information security, research software development and informatics.