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OKLAHOMA SUPERCOMPUTING SYMPOSIUM 2018



OSCER

OU IT

OK EPSCoR

Great Plains Network, www.greatplains.net


Table of Contents


PLENARY SPEAKERS

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Michael Norman
Michael Norman

Director
San Diego Supercomputer Center
University of California San Diego

Topic: "Tales from the Long Tail of HPC: The Comet Experiment"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract

Coming soon

Biography

Dr. Michael L. Norman was named Interim Director of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in June 2009 and was appointed to the position of Director in September 2010. Dr. Norman is a distinguished professor of Physics at UCSD and a globally recognized astrophysicist. Dr. Norman is a pioneer in using advanced computational methods to explore the universe and its beginnings. In this capacity, he has directed the Laboratory for Computational Astrophysics — a collaborative effort between UCSD and SDSC, resulting in the Enzo community code for astrophysics and cosmology, in use worldwide.

Following his appointment as SDSC's chief scientific officer in June 2008, Dr. Norman worked to foster collaborations across the UCSD campus for cyberinfrastructure-oriented research, development and education. He also serves as division director of SDSC's Cyberinfrastructure Research, Education and Development (CI-RED), and is the Principal Investigator for two of SDSC's leading HPC systems — Gordon-Simons and Comet — which together represent more than $42 million in National Science Foundation funding.

Dr. Norman's work has earned him numerous honors, including Germany's prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize, the IEEE Sidney Fernbach Award, and several HPCC Challenge Awards. He also is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Physical Society. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering and applied sciences from University of California Davis, and in 1984 completed his post-doctoral work at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany.

From 1986 to 2000, Dr. Norman held numerous positions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as a National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) associate director and senior research scientist under Larry Smarr, currently UCSD's director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2); and as a professor of astronomy. From 1984 to 1986, he was a staff member at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Dr. Robert M. Panoff
Dr. Robert M. Panoff

Executive Director
Shodor Education Foundation
Scientist in Residence
Wofford College

Topic: "What the Sciences Can Learn from Each Other: An Exploration of Interdisciplinary Supercomputing"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract

Research and progress in high performance computing often require multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary efforts to take advantage of model and simulation approaches. In this talk, I will explore some ideas that demonstrate how the thinking in one science can influence a simulation in another. We'll draw examples from biology and physics, primarily, to show what we can learn from each other.

Biography

Dr. Robert M. Panoff is founder and Executive Director of the Shodor Education Foundation, a non-profit education and research corporation in Durham NC, dedicated to reform and improvement of mathematics and science education through computational and communication technologies. He serves as Undergraduate Education Director for both the eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) and the Blue Waters Petascale Computing effort, both in partnership with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). He is currently Visiting Professor at Wofford College. His work explores the interactions between technology and education to develop courses and interactive simulation modules that combine standards, curriculum, supercomputing resources and desktop computers.

In recognition of Dr. Panoff's efforts in college faculty enhancement and curriculum development, Shodor was named as an NSF Foundation Partner for the revitalization of undergraduate education. In 1998, Shodor established the Shodor Computational Science Institute, which was expanded with NSF funding in 2001 to become the National Computational Science Institute (NCSI). Shodor's Computational Science Education Reference Desk (CSERD) serves nearly 4 million webviews per month as a Pathway portal of the National Science Digital Library. Dr. Panoff consults at several national laboratories and is a frequent presenter at NSF workshops on visualization, supercomputing, and networking.

Dr. Panoff received his M.A. and Ph.D. in theoretical Physics from Washington University in St. Louis, with both pre- and postdoctoral work at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. In 2005, Wofford College, awarded Dr. Panoff, an honorary Doctor of Science degree, in recognition of his leadership in computational science education. In 2014, he was the recipient of the SIGCSE Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education Award.

Dan Stanzione
Dan Stanzione

Executive Director
Texas Advanced Computing Center
The University of Texas

Topic: to be announced

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract

Coming soon

Biography

Dan Stanzione is the Executive Director of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin and the Principal Investigator for Wrangler. He is also the PI for TACC's 10 PetaFlop Stampede supercomputer, and has previously been involved in the deployment and operation of the Ranger and Lonestar supercomputers at TACC. He served as the Co-Director of The iPlant Collaborative, an ambitious endeavor to build cyberinfrastructure to address the grand challenges of plant science. Prior to joining TACC, Dr. Stanzione was the founding director of the Ira A. Fulton High Performance Computing Institute (HPCI) at Arizona State University (ASU). Before ASU, he served as an AAAS Science Policy Fellow in the National Science Foundation and as a research professor at Clemson University, his alma mater.

Henry Neeman
Henry Neeman

Assistant Vice President – Research Strategy Advisor
Information Technology
Director
OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER)
Information Technology
Associate Professor
College of Engineering
Adjunct Associate Professor
School of Computer Science
University of Oklahoma
Joint Co-manager (with Dana Brunson)
XSEDE Campus Engagement program

Topic: "OSCER State of the Center Address"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract

The OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER) celebrated its 17th anniversary on August 31 2018. In this report, we examine what OSCER is, what OSCER does, what OSCER has accomplished in its 16 years, and where OSCER is going.

Biography

Dr. Henry Neeman is the Director of the OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research, Assistant Vice President Information Techology – Research Strategy Advisor, Associate Professor in the College of Engineering and Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science at the University of Oklahoma. He and Dana Brunson have been appointed joint co-leads of the XSEDE Campus Engagement program, which includes the Campus Champions.

He received his BS in computer science and his BA in statistics with a minor in mathematics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1987, his MS in CS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1990 and his PhD in CS from UIUC in 1996. Prior to coming to OU, Dr. Neeman was a postdoctoral research associate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at UIUC, and before that served as a graduate research assistant both at NCSA and at the Center for Supercomputing Research & Development.

In addition to his own teaching and research, Dr. Neeman has collaborated with dozens of research groups, applying High Performance Computing techniques in fields such as numerical weather prediction, bioinformatics and genomics, data mining, high energy physics, astronomy, nanotechnology, petroleum reservoir management, river basin modeling and engineering optimization. He serves as an ad hoc advisor to student researchers in many of these fields.

Dr. Neeman's research interests include high performance computing, scientific computing, parallel and distributed computing and computer science education.


BREAKOUT SPEAKERS TO BE ANNOUNCED

Brady Deetz
Brady Deetz

IT Manager
Information Technology
Laureate Institute for Brain Research

Topic: "Making an HPC Storage Procurement Decision Informed by HPC"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Abstract

Laureate Institute for Brain Research faces yet another storage challenge in 2018. This challenge is created by the existence of a sizable amount (160 TB) of scientific data made up of files ranging in size between 20 KB and 80 KB that need to be available for analysis. While this data can be stored in our 5 PB nearline storage environment made up of HDDs and Ceph, performance for analysis is not what our users would prefer. Furthermore, LIBR operates a VMware environment consisting of approximately 150 guests consuming 50 TB of storage. Both scenarios would benefit greatly from a flash storage offering. Unfortunately, 200+ TB of flash storage is not a cheap ask. As such, LIBR embarked on an effort to add flash storage to its existing Ceph storage environment.

Because Ceph generally is not a commercial product with standardized hardware and known performance characteristics, LIBR must determine how its cluster will perform with specific disks under specific workloads. This talk covers how LIBR is leveraging its HPC environment to analyze over 20 billion benchmark data-points created with a battery of tests against each candidate model of SSD being evaluated in this project.

Biography

Brady Deetz is the head of IT for the Laureate Institute for Brain Research, a clinical neuroscience research institute in Tulsa OK. At LIBR, he is responsible for research computing and data storage in support of multidisciplinary research programs in neuroimaging, behavioral health, and biochemical measures. Key cyberinfrastructure resources include petascale tape storage; a petascale disk (Ceph) resource, and local compute servers.

Kyle Hutson
Kyle Hutson

System Administrator
Department of Computer Science
Kansas State University

Topic: "Birds-of-a-Feather Session: HPC System Administrators"

Slides: none

Abstract

We recently observed that system administrators are often leary of advice (even from their direct supervisors) unless it has been given from somebody else who (a) has signficant relevant experience, (b) they know and trust, and (c) can point out the "gotchas." This Birds-of-a-Feather session is for system administrators to talk among themselves about current pain-points, things we've done that have turned out well, and things we've done that have flopped.

Biography

Kyle Hutson has been involved with Linux system administration since 1994. He received his bachelor's degree from Kansas State University in computer engineering in 1995. He has worked in non-profit, public sector, and private sector IT services, including several years as a small business IT consultant. Kyle joined Kansas State University's HPC team in 2012.

Adnan Khaleel
Adnan Khaleel

Director, Global Sales Strategy for High Performance Computing & Artificial Intelligence
ISG
Dell EMC

Topic: "Can HPC technologies lead the way for AI?"

Slides: available after the Symposium

Talk Abstract:

Deep Learning (DL) is the new posterchild for cutting-edge technologies, with AI-fueled breakthroughs being announced almost on a daily basis. Many of the algorithms behind DL are several decades old, and advances in affordable hardware technologies, coupled with copious amounts of usable data, has led to the recent resurgence in interest. Even though we're still in the early days of DL as a technology, researchers are already running into hurdles of scalability. For the practitioners in HPC, this is nothing new, where the argument of scale-up vs scale-out has played out has seen a clear winner dictated more by practicality rather than technology. Is Deep Learning at a similar juncture, and what can our experience with HPC tell us about where it's headed?

Biography

Adnan Khaleel is a seasoned business development professional with over 18 years of experience in High Performance Computing and Machine Learning. Currently, Adnan is leading Global HPC Sales Strategy at Dell EMC, focusing on Sales Strategy for HPC & AI. Due of his technical background, Adnan often works very closely with customers in helping them choose optimal HPC solutions and architectures. Prior to Dell EMC, Adnan was the product manager at Cray responsible for big data analytics, and led the development and launch of the award winning Urika-XA™ High Performance Data Analytics (HPDA) platform. Prior to Cray, Adnan served as the chief technical marketer at Newisys, an Austin TX server startup, and prior to that, as a member of the Hardware Architecture groups at both HaL computers and Motorola, where he developed innovative simulation tools for architectural studies on next-generation massively parallel systems. Adnan has a deeply technical engineering background in designing SuperScalar processors, high-speed computer networks, and massively scalable systems design. He has also published several papers on computer networks, and holds a U.S. patent on multiprocessor technologies. He has an MBA from the McCombs School of Business at University of Texas and an MS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University.